Blueberry Frozen Greek Yogurt

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I made this for breakfast, because why the hell not?  I am an adult, at least that’s what the government tells me so I choose to make adult decisions and one of those happens to be eating frozen dessert for breakfast.  Whatever, it’s pretty much the exact same as eating a bowl of yogurt for breakfast except way more awesome.  Plus with the addition of vodka, it becomes a party.    And you know what they say about parties in the morning–they’re convenient because some people get sleepy late at night.

Recipe:

16 oz Greek yogurt (I used 2%)
8 oz fresh berries (I used blueberries but there were 3 or 4 rogue blackberries in there)
1 tbsp white sugar + 1 packet artificial sweetener (if you need it a little sweeter)
1 tbsp arrowroot starch (optional)
1 tbsp vodka (optional)

Add your blueberries and sugar to a pot and cook over low heat.

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Cook them until they burst.  It’s up to you how chunky you want your blueberries, I broke mine up more than this.  One, because I didn’t want huge chunks and two, because I wanted to add them in in the beginning and didn’t want them to mess up my ice cream maker.

Take away from heat and either put in the fridge to chill or if you’re impatient like me swirl your pot around in cold water to lower the temperature.

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Add your 1 tbsp arrowroot starch (not needed but adds a creamier texture without having to add as much fat) to a mixing bowl.

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Add your cooled blueberries and whisk together, you can use your whisk to break apart your blueberries more.

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Add your yogurt.  Don’t over mix it.  A lot of recipes have you strain the yogurt to remove the excess water, valid.  But it was the morning and I am not a morning person and I was hungry and impatient so straining my yogurt seemed like the stupidest thing I could think of.  But do what you wish, maybe you’re more of a morning person than I am.  Or maybe you will join sides with the majority of the populace and not eat this for breakfast.  One might ask, “If you aren’t a morning person then why would go to the trouble of making frozen yogurt from scratch?”  I don’t believe I ever claimed to live a logical existence.

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I waited to add this because I figured most people wouldn’t want to do it.  I added vodka because like the arrowroot (but in a very different way) it helps keep the yogurt creamy.  I always have the trouble when making frozen yogurt with it freezing as soon as I add it to my ice cream maker.  This helps prevent that.

And if you’re worried about tasting the vodka, you won’t.  Unless it’s some terribly cheap vodka even a Russian wouldn’t touch.  Aren’t stereotypes fun?   It’s like in college, we all convinced ourselves Burnett’s Vodka was the shit.  Do yourself a favor and graduate from that mindset, go up like two shelves and get Smirnoff or Stoli.

I completely forgot what I was talking about.  Oh yes, if you taste the vodka I’m willing to wager it’s all in your head or you have a crazy perceptive pallet and you should be spending your time trying to profit off of it not bitching at me that your frozen yogurt tastes like vodka.

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Make per your ice cream maker’s directions or if you’re trying to do it by putting it in the freezer and mixing it up every few minutes then have fun with that.

If you want it a little sweeter it tastes delicious with some honey drizzle.

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I was going to show you how it froze to show you that the vodka stops it from getting completely rock hard — don’t get too excited, it still gets hard.  That sentence ended in a weird place.  Anyway, but Justin and I finished the entire thing in one sitting.  Oops!

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4 thoughts on “Blueberry Frozen Greek Yogurt

  1. Yes! It’s much harder to make good tasting light ice cream like you buy in the store because they just have much better equipment. So you kind of have to make the high fat frozen custard style when doing it at home. I’m still trying to make an awesome tasting lower calorie version though. 😀

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